Using the Whole Animal Workshop

2017-pig-class-flyer

“USING THE WHOLE ANIMAL”
PIG SLAUGHTERING & PROCESSING WORKSHOP
with Tamara Wilder

MARCH 11 & 12 , 2017 (Saturday & Sunday)
9am – 6pm daily
(with 6-8pm potluck feast & optional camping Saturday night)
Petaluma, CA

Many people who eat meat feel that they are out of touch with the sources and processes behind the food that ends up on their plate.
The knowledge required to efficiently and humanely process an animal into food is an essential tool for self sufficiency.

Pigs are also considered to be one of the most “edible” of animals, meaning that every part can be easily transformed into a delicious dish.
Being omnivorous “garbage disposals” that consume garden, orchard and dairy surplus and transform it into delicious meat & fat, pigs have long provided a staple of food and fat for homesteading families.

Pork is particularly desirable as a meat because it is very good fresh but is also exceptionally tasty when cured and smoked into bacon and ham.
The fat also provides an essential staple for baking and cooking when rendered into lard.

As a group we will slaughter and process a domestic pig.
This includes:
– extracting the innards (heart, lungs, liver, spleen, blood, fat, etc…) and preparing them for a delicious potluck dinner,
– processing the other miscellaneous parts (tongue, ears, head, skin for pork rinds, stomache, intestines for sausages, bones for bone broth, fat for lard),
– cutting the carcass into usable pieces;
– grinding meat & fat and stuffing them into intestine casings

COST: $300 – $375 sliding scale (includes seminar, potluck-style Sat feast, tools, materials & portion of meat and products such as bacon, bone broth, lard, etc….. that we create)

$150 deposit and registration form holds your space.

Registration Form & ?’s: Cole 707-364-4462 or email **colesmith194969@gmail.com
**please note that email on flyer is different and use this one instead. Thanks:)

Honoring the Ancient Fibersheds Blog


In planning for the upcoming Spiritweavers Gathering (where I am planning on helping Bethany Ridenauer teach a class on braintanning rabbit furs),  I just found this old Fibershed blog from 2011 called   Honoring the Ancient Fibersheds.

bethany-ringing-hide

It’s from a braintanning class in Bolinas where  Bethany was helping out and has some incredible photographs of the whole process. Check it out:)

 

 

 

Video Series on Making Quality Hide Glue

hideglue header

Howdy folks.  I’ve been MIA on the Paleotechnics blog for a while.  I spent quite a bit of my time, thought and energy this last year focusing on recovering my health and on audio/visual stuff for making videos.  The good news is that my health has been considerably better and I’m getting pretty well set up for shooting decent quality videos, though I still have a lot of progress ahead of me in both goals.

I’m shooting a video series on making high grade hide glue.  At least that is the goal, we’ll see when I test the glue after it’s finished, or maybe have it tested.  The third video, on liming, is uploading to YouTube as I’m typing this.  The approach is a sort of learn as you follow along kind of thing, going through the process of turning a cattle hide from Tamara’s recent cattle processing class into hide glue.  Every time I go to work on the skin, I take some video and edit it down.  One section is sort of a lecture type deal with some chalkboard action, one is on fleshing and, aside from the liming one uploading now, the others will be de-hairing and de-liming, cooking and pouring, then finally cutting and drying.  Maybe at some point there will be one on testing the finished glue.

In the first video I got off to a rough start.  I had just done a shot the night before (LDI, Low Dose Immunotherapy, or LDA) that is something like an allergy shot for systemic autoimmune type issues (including lyme disease related things for you lymies out there).  I was pretty wonky from the initial immune reaction including a low grade fever for most of the day.  In spite of all that I had unusual energy and managed to flesh the entire skin and get it in the lime bath.  So, in the beginning I look kind of like a rat that was partially drowned and hung up overnight to dry and I’m fairly brain dead to boot, but I snap out of it pretty quick, so hang in there!  The LDA Shot seemed to work though!  I’m getting the next one soon and I’m hopeful that I will continue to feel increasingly better and able to bring you good content more often.

This hide glue series will be fairly long, but there are things in there to learn beyond making hide glue.  Little snippets about other stuff relating to tanning skins and such inevitably work their way in.  No process is an island after all.  So far these videos have been decidedly lacking in popularity and the total number of people that really get a lot out of this will probably not be that many.  But it will be there when people are ready for it, and that is most of the reason I do this stuff at this point, as a reference archive and so it doesn’t all die with me one day.  Personally, I think it’s really cool, even though I’ve so far mostly restrained myself from going on long tangents about multiple related processes and ideas.  Poking around looking at other hide glue videos on youtube, a lot (or most?) of them use rawhide chew toys cut up in pieces.  Nothing wrong with that in context I suppose, but that has never been what we, or the genesis of Paleotechnics, has ever been about.  I’m definitely bringing you something closer to the ground up version.

The link below goes to the main Playlist into which all videos in the series will be placed as they come out.  I think anyone with any kind of google account, like Gmail, can subscribe for updates.  My channel, for now, is a mixed bag of stuff I get up to.  I’m also currently also doing a series on amateur apple breeding, which will follow my progress over the years attempting to breed up some new red fleshed apples here at the Turkeysong experimental homestead.  For the hide glue series,  I’m in the dehairing/refleshing/deliming process now, so that one should be up soon.  When finished, I will probably sell the glue on Etsy.  If that works, maybe I’ll add artisan hide glue making to my list of little income sources.  Artisanal hide glue for artisanal artisans, you know instrument makers, fine artists who use traditional materials, fine woodworkers that want their furniture to be fully repairable in the future and the likes of them.  People who are keepin’ it real!  See ya…

 

 

 

Seasoning Bones: How to avoid cracking in drying bones

bone seasoning header Bone is a beautiful and useful material, but if you pick up any random bone from the yard, or one that has been buried, it may very well be cracked.  That is because bones contain quite a bit of water and, like wood, when drying bone is subjected to stresses caused by shrinkage.  Something has to give if the stress is high, and the bone will start to come apart along the grain forming “checks”.  Rules similar to those for drying wood without checking can be applied to bone.

Typical cracking along the grain of the bone.  Bone, like wood, has a grain direction.

Typical cracking along the grain of the bone. Bone, like wood, has a grain direction.

Size matters:  Like a large piece of wood, a large bone is more liable to crack than a small one.  Small bones will often dry without cracking regardless of how they are dried.  If I bury a leg and dig it up a year later, none of the small toe bones will be cracked, but most of the larger leg bones will have checks in them. Speed matters:  Drying things fast causes more stress than drying things slow.  That is because when things dry they shrink.  As the outside, which is drying faster, shrinks, it has to shrink around the plumper, slower drying interior and cracks are liable to form in the outside.  It helps quite a bit that bones are hollow.  One way to decrease checking in wood is to bore a hole through the center.  But, see next… Bone is very dense:  Dense materials tend to check more easily than less dense materials.  Very heavy dense woods are more liable to cracking in general than light porous woods for instance.  So, even though bones generally have the advantage of being hollow, they still have a strong tendency to check if not dried in a controlled way.  If a bone was at thick as a tree or split piece of wood, I doubt there would be much that you could do to prevent checking, or at least it would take extreme measures. Control drying:  The best way to avoid checking is to control the speed of drying, and there are several ways to do this.       *Humid environment:  Drying in a humid environment slows moisture loss, and that’s what it’s all about.  If the moisture loss is gradual, moisture from the interior of the bone has time to redistribute throughout the bone, resulting in more even moisture loss, which translates to less stress on the bone’s structure.       *Slowing drying of the exterior with a coating:  Coating the bone with something to slow the drying of the exterior will also allow the whole bone to dry at a more even rate, greatly reducing the likelihood of checking.  Using animal fat is easy and effective.  Fat can also seep into the bone replacing some of the water. (more…)

Antler v.s. Bone: A contest of context.

By Steven Edholm

We like to see things as black and white, good or bad, better and worse.  It helps us function in daily life where we need to make fast judgements or live on cruise control without having to over analyze everything.  But it is also a trap that can limit us and cause us to do really dumb stuff.  It helps to look at things in context.  We can pit antler against bone to see which one is better for tools and such, but the victor will be dependent on circumstance and what it is that we are trying to accomplish, rather than on more arbitrary grounds.  Both Tamara and I have largely gravitated toward espousing and detailing the qualities of materials as a way to view paleotechnics.  While our feeble minds may gravitate toward one or the other as superior, redwood is not oak, soapstone is not jade, antler is not bone, and none is superior to the other except in the context of specific uses.  Bury an oak fencepost and it will probably fall over in 5 to 10 years, where redwood may last for 50 or much more.  Make a bow out of redwood heartwood, but in spite of your best design efforts, it’s just going to be kind of lame.

Some bone and anlter objects.  The hoop in the center is elk antler thinned by scraping with stone flakes.  Bottom is a bone handle for a dry hide scraper of chert stone.  top right is a handle for a stone scraper with relief carving.  top left, is an antler pressure flaker bound to a wooden handle.  All of these items are made with primitive processes.

Some bone and antler objects. The hoop in the center is a choker made of an elk antler section thinned by scraping with stone flakes.  It would not stay round because one end was from near the base where the antler is much more dense.  After thinning and boiling repeatedly, it finally lost it’s flexibility and broke, probably from loss of collagen.  Too bad, it was a really cool and a lot of work.  But then, you get to learn from my mistakes, which makes me happy.  Lessons learned, cut an item like this from antler of uniform character and don’t boil antler too much.  Bottom is a bone handle for a dry hide scraper of chert would be better differently shaped of elk antler.  Top right is a handle for a stone scraper with relief carving. top left, is an antler pressure stone flaking tool bound to a wooden handle.  middle right, an ulna bone awl and a bone arrowhead hafted to a wooden shaft.   All of these items are made with primitive processes.

Bone and antler are similar materials.  The qualities of both can vary quite a bit, but they are still very different.  bone can be more or less flexible depending on many factors, like what part of the animal, what species, age etc.. but antler is, by it’s nature, generally tougher and more flexible than bone.  Some uses of these two materials will overlap, while for others, one is clearly superior to the other.  Keep these thoughts in mind as I’m speaking in generalities here. (more…)

Hide Glue Part II: Glue making, the basic essentials

about hide glue headerBy Steven Edholm

Making hide glue, is well within the reach of anyone with access to the necessary materials, and is a great addition to your skill set.  In part one I discussed hide glue in general, what it is, and some of it’s strengths and weaknesses.  This article is a combination of personal experience and research into technical aspects of glue making.  Like most people,  I started my glue making career boiling down hide shavings and stray hock skins, without any further preparation.  Glue strong enough for many uses can be made with little care and marginal materials, but over time and with the input of  glue making professionals of the 19th and early 20th century, I found that a little care goes a long way toward making stronger, prettier and better smelling, glue   Here are the most important basic concepts and steps in making very high quality hide glue.

hide glue cube macro

Clarity is a good sign. opaque glue is not necessarily bad glue, but clear glue generally indicates that care was taken in processing.

Common materials for glue making are:  Skin (including fish skins), fish air bladders, sinew scraps, and antler.  (Bone can be used to make a glue, but it is harder to make and inferior to glue from the sources we’ll be talking about.) (more…)

Hide Glue part I : Meet Hide Glue

about hide glue headerThis is the first part in what will hopefully be a two or three, or even four, part series on Hide Glue.  Very few people are making really high quality glue these days.  The plan is to provide a solid introduction with practical steps to making high quality glue, and to cover the basics of using it.  Following posts will have to wait for time, energy and pictures.  You can subscribe on the right to receive notification of new posts via email so you don’t have to stay glued to your screen.

Collagen Glue, aka hide glue or animal glue, is made from the parts of animal bodies which contain large amounts of collagen.  Collagen is abundant in animal bodies, but certain parts are highly concentrated sources of relatively pure collagen of the type useful for making glue.  Commonly used glue materials are skin (including fish skins), sinews (the fibers which connect bones to muscles) and antler.  Fish air bladders have been used to make an especially strong glue.  The common practice of using skin scraps to make glue has given us the term Hide Glue, which is generally used for all collagen glues regardless of the raw material used to produce it.  The materials are cooked long and slow to dissolve the collagen, followed by drying the resulting gelatin which is then reconstituted in water as needed.

There is a misunderstanding that glue is made from hooves.  The horny outer covering of hooves does not contain useful collagen.  Hoof sheaths and horns are more physiologically related to hair and are primarily composed of keratin which does not go into solution when cooked in water.  The bones and ligaments inside the hoof do contain a lot of collagen and have commonly been used to by glue boilers to make glue and neatsfoot oil.  Making glue from the whole lower legs is not generally a good choice for home producers due to contamination from fats and other unwanted substances.  If you try to make glue from the hoof sheath itself, it won’t work.  I know, I’ve tried.  Instead, I recommend extracting some of the glue making parts from the lower legs and feet and then using just those, but that is for another post. (more…)

The Most Common Bark Tanning Mistakes: Pitfalls to avoid on your way to beautiful leather!

grain header

By Steven Edholm

Hey!, the Buckeye Gathering barktanning class is coming up and I have bark on the brain.  This article is going to be awesome.  A lot of people ask my advice on barktanning and I see the same mistakes made over and over again.  I can help, because I’ve made them all too (and still sometimes do), so I know whereof I speak!  So listen up fledgling barktanners, because we can save you a lot of frustration, heartbreak and WTF moments.

Procrastination:  This is a common mistake in tanning in general.  I still do it all the time, unfortunately, but I shouldn’t and you shouldn’t either.  Bark tanning is more forgiving than some other types of tanning because some of the solutions the hide is put into can be preservative to a degree, but that shouldn’t be used as an excuse to keep putting off what needs doing.  The solutions used in liming and tanning are not foolproof and will not preserve the skin indefinitely, so try not to use their limited preservative power as an excuse for procrastination.  good luck with that.

procrastination can lead to problems such as this damaged grain, which has lifted from the main body of the skin.

procrastination can lead to problems such as this damaged grain, which has lifted from the main body of the skin.

(more…)